News
News //
Submitted by // P Yeung, Partner
21 January 2019

 

The Labour Tribunal's Power to Order a Claimant to Provide a Security Payment - a speed bump for parties with weak claims or who abuse the process

Hon Sau Har v. Lo Woon Bor Henry T/A Henry Lo & Co Solicitors, [2018] HKCU 3914

Introduction

Since 2014, the Labour Tribunal has had the power to order parties to provide security for awards or orders (see section 30(1) of the Labour Tribunal Ordinance). The grounds for making such an order are relatively broad and give the Labour Tribunal considerable discretion, including making an order for security for a party's costs.

There has been little case law on how this discretion should be exercised. In a 2015 case, an employee was ordered to pay security for payment of an award essentially because he had abused the process (see Lam Che Fu v The Chinese Kitchen (Sai Kung) Ltd). Clearly, the making of such an order against an employee can have a drastic effect on their ability to pursue their claim. A recent decision of the Court of First Instance, Hon Sau Har v. Lo Woon Bor Henry T/A Henry Lo & Co Solicitors, [2018] HKCU 3914, shed some further light on this area of law. This alert provides a summary of the case and highlights the principles which are to be considered in granting an order for security for payment of an award or order in a Labour Tribunal case.

Background facts

The Claimant was a secretary employed by the Defendant, which is a law firm. She worked for the Defendant for less than 2 years and was dismissed by the Defendant with one month's payment in lieu of notice.

The Claimant claimed for annual bonus, pro-rata payment for unused annual leave and termination payments. The Defendant argued that:

(1) annual bonus was discretionary depending on the financial situation of the law firm according to the employment agreement;

(2) the pro-rata payment for unused annual leaves should only be payable in the event that the Claimant had worked for more than 3 months in the year she was dismissed; and

(3) the termination payments should only be granted where the employee has been employed for a period of not less than 24 months, according to law.

In the call-over hearing before the Labour Tribunal, the Presiding Officer explained to the Claimant that both the Labour Department and the Labour Tribunal officer had informed her all her claims lacked merit. The Claimant insisted on pursuing her claims, so the Defendant applied for an order for payment of security for costs.

The Presiding Officer made an order for payment of security for costs against the Claimant on the basis that "the Claimant could not demonstrate that she has a high degree of probability of success at trial". The Claimant did not make the security payment and the Presiding Officer ordered her claims against the Defendant to be dismissed. The Claimant appealed against the orders to the Court of First Instance.

The Court of First Instance decision

In the Court of First Instance, Deputy High Court Judge Marlene Ng (as she then was) had to consider whether the order or determination by the Tribunal was (a) erroneous in point of law or (b) outside the jurisdiction of the Tribunal.

The Claimant argued that she had a low income and therefore it would be unfair to impose a security payment order against her. The Court considered whether there were any balancing factors which meant that a security payment order should not be imposed on the Claimant. Such balancing factors included considering whether the Claimant had a strong and valid claim.

The Court took the view that the Presiding Officer had not erred in point of law and agreed that the Claimant's claims lacked merit. Briefly, the Court's reasoning is as follows:

(1) The Claimant clearly had not been employed under a continuous contract for a period of no less than 24 months. Therefore, her claim for terminal payments was groundless. The Claimant was aware of this as she said she intended to drop this claim.

(2) In relation to the Claimant's claim for annual bonus, the Claimant did not dispute that the bonus provision was discretionary and binding. Accordingly, the Court agreed with the Presiding Officer's view that the Claimant was unlikely to succeed in her argument that the provision should be interpreted in her favour.

(3) As regards the claim for annual leave payments, the Claimant did not satisfy the requirement of working for more than 3 months in the year she was dismissed. This claim clearly lacked merit.

The Court also considered the Claimant's income level and financial situation, which posed a risk that she may not be able to compensate the Defendant's costs in the event that she was not successful in her claims. Meanwhile, the Defendant may also have to incur additional costs in seeking to execute any costs order, which would be unfair to the Defendant. Therefore, an order for security for costs was "just and expedient" in this case.

Takeaway points

In considering whether an order for security for payment of an award or order should be made, the Tribunal would consider the following:

(1) whether the claimant has sufficient financial means to pay for the defendant's costs if the claimant fails to prove his/her claim;

(2) whether the claimant has strong merits in his/her case; and

(3) if it cannot be determined that the claimant has a reasonable chance of success in his/her claim, whether there are any balancing factors which militate against an order for security being made.

When deciding on the amount of the security payment, the Tribunal will take into consideration the defendant representative's income and the amount of time expected to be spent on the case by such defendant representative.

The Presiding Officers have indicated a willingness to invoke this power in cases where they consider that employees are pursuing weak or meritless claims. It should not be forgotten that the Labour Tribunal can also make such orders against employers.
 


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Howse Williams Bowers is an independent law firm which combines the in-depth experience of its lawyers with a forward thinking approach.

Our key practice areas are corporate/commercial and corporate finance; commercial and maritime dispute resolution; clinical negligence and healthcare; insurance, personal injury and professional indemnity insurance; employment; family and matrimonial; property and building management; banking; fraud; financial services/corporate regulatory and compliance.

As an independent law firm we are able to minimise legal and commercial conflicts of interest and act for clients in every industry sector. The partners have spent the majority of their careers in Hong Kong and have a detailed understanding of international business and business in Asia.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this article is intended to be a general guide only and is not intended to provide legal advice.  Please contact pr@hwbhk.com if you have any questions about the article.

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Press //
Submitted by // C C Tan, Partner
11 January 2019

 

Howse Williams Bowers ("HWB"), a leading Hong Kong independent law firm, has advised A.Plus Group Holdings Limited (Stock Code on GEM: 8251; Stock Code on Main Board: 1841) ("A.Plus") on its transfer of listing from GEM to the Main Board of the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. Red Sun Capital Limited acted as the sponsor. The shares commenced trading on the Main Board of the Hong Kong Stock Exchange on 11 January 2019.

A.Plus is an established financial printing service provider in Hong Kong. It mainly provides typesetting, design, translation, printing and delivery services in relation to financial reports, announcements, shareholder circular, debt offering circulars, IPO prospectus and fund documents.

HWB is honoured and delighted to be part of another significant milestone for A.Plus. This transfer of listing is the second case to date which has been successfully approved under the streamlined process that requires the appointment of a sponsor. The firm was also previously involved in the listing of A.Plus on GEM in April 2016. The HWB team, led by partner Chia Ching Tan, had lead responsibility in legal documentation, corporate and regulatory issues and general transaction management.


About Us

Howse Williams Bowers is an independent law firm which combines the in-depth experience of its lawyers with a forward thinking approach.

Our key practice areas are corporate/commercial and corporate finance; commercial and maritime dispute resolution; clinical negligence and healthcare; insurance, personal injury and professional indemnity insurance; employment; family and matrimonial; property and building management; intellectual property; banking; financial services/corporate regulatory and compliance.

As an independent law firm we are able to minimise legal and commercial conflicts of interest and act for clients in every industry sector. The partners have spent the majority of their careers in Hong Kong and have a detailed understanding of international business and business in Asia.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this article is intended to be a general guide only and is not intended to provide legal advice.  Please contact pr@hwbhk.com if you have any questions about the article.

 
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Submitted by // A Yung, Partner
04 December 2018

 

Howse Williams Bowers ("HWB"), a leading Hong Kong independent law firm, advised CMBC Capital Finance Limited ("CMBCCF"), a direct wholly-owned subsidiary of CMBC Capital Holdings Limited (Stock Code: 1141) ("CMBC"), as lender in a term loan facility ("New Facility") to refinance an existing acquisition financing also granted by CMBCCF to China New Higher Education Group Limited (Stock Code: 2001) ("CNHEG"). Pursuant to the New Facility, CMBCCF has agreed to make available a term loan facility in the aggregate amount of HK$150,000,000 to CNHEG.

CMBC and its subsidiaries including CMBCCF are principally engaged in securities business, investment and financing, asset management and advisory business. CNHEG is a leading private formal higher education group in China and is principally engaged in higher education in a wide selection of fields in applied sciences.

The HWB team was led by partner, Antony Yung and assisted by associate, Sonya Mahbubani and trainee solicitor, Elizabeth Pong. The team had the lead responsibility on legal documentation, advising on corporate and legal issues and undertaking general transaction management. The team also advised CMBCCF on the original acquisition financing.


About Us

Howse Williams Bowers is an independent law firm which combines the in-depth experience of its lawyers with a forward thinking approach.

Our key practice areas are corporate/commercial and corporate finance; commercial and maritime dispute resolution; clinical negligence and healthcare; insurance, personal injury and professional indemnity insurance; employment; family and matrimonial; property and building management; intellectual property; banking; fraud; financial services/corporate regulatory and compliance.

As an independent law firm we are able to minimise legal and commercial conflicts of interest and act for clients in every industry sector. The partners have spent the majority of their careers in Hong Kong and have a detailed understanding of international business and business in Asia.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this article is intended to be a general guide only and is not intended to provide legal advice.  Please contact pr@hwbhk.com if you have any questions about the article.

 
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Publications //
Submitted by // M Withington, Partner; P Yeung, Partner
22 November 2018

 

ILO Court limits scope of non-solicitation restrictions

Click here to see the International Law Office Article

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